Restaurant re-branding

 (Kathryn Wagner)

I am pleased to share with you an image from a recent production of a Charleston restaurant that features Mediterranean cuisine on it’s menu. Truly a pleasure to photograph. The shoot was dedicated to showing potential diners the virtues of eating cuisine such as this salad above: fast, fresh, and healthy. Photographs are licensed to appear in-store, on the eatery’s website and as a part of their social media branding. As a professional food photographer I was impressed by the use of color in this genre of casual fare, with many red, oranges and purple hues found on the plates. I will soon be posting the full details of the restaurant’s  branding identity redesign and the images in action on the restaurant’s website / social media – stay tuned!

Update: FULL DETAILS HERE

How to eat an oyster…

 

I was pleased to participate in a genuine Lowcountry tradition this past week: the Oyster Roast. Oyster Season traditionally begins in the in the fall and is currently in full swing here in Charleston. Growing up in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains it is a rare opportunity to partake in such an event which makes me grateful to have covered the Great Oysterpoint Runoff this past weekend. Sponsored by Toyota and Keen the event benefitted the Charleston Waterkeeper organization and the National Waterkeeper Alliance and was held in support of clean waterways  and wastewater runoff prevention in the Charleston area. As a profssional photographer it is wonderful to be able to use my skills and resources to promote worthy causes such as this. Overall a rewarding and educational experience.

Jonathan Swift is quoted as having said, “He was a bold man that first ate an oyster”,[18] but evidence of oyster consumption goes back into prehistory, evidenced by oyster middens found worldwide. Oysters were an important food source in all coastal areas where they could be found, and oyster fisheries were an important industry where they were plentiful. Overfishing and pressure from diseases and pollution have sharply reduced supplies, but they remain a popular treat celebrated in oyster festivals in many cities and towns.

There are several different types of oysters that are edible out of the over 50 different kinds that are in the oceans today.” – Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

Charleston’s Gateway Walk: the Unitarian Churchyard

 (Kathryn Wagner)

A brick path winds between beds of wildflowers in Charleston’s Unitarian Universalist Churchyard, a part of the historic Gateway Walk.

As a professional travel photographer discovering hidden gems such as the Garden Club of Charleston’s Gateway Walk are a favorite part of the job. This peaceful, gorgeous meander takes one through several churchyards, and several hundred years of history in South Carolina. “While Charleston cannot boast as many oak-ringed parks as Savannah, the four-block Gateway Walk is just as beautiful, with a series of interconnected and semihidden gardens. The walk is lined with moss-laden oaks and takes you past the city’s most historically significant churches.” – 36 Hours in Charleston, The New York Times. This is the first in a series of garden images capturing this beautiful stroll. A guide to enjoying the walk firsthand is below, courtesy of The Garden Club of Charleston.

Pirates in the park?

 (Kathryn Wagner)

“In the course of five weeks, [in the Autumn of 1718] forty-nine pirates had swung from the gallows at White Point. Within a couple months, pirate Richard Worley and nineteen of his men met the same fate. While the leaves of White Point Gardens’ oaks calmly sway in the ocean breeze, their roots are feeding on the blood of pirates.” – Southern Spirit Guide


Meet Alabaster, the Albino Alligator

 (Kathryn Wagner)

Alabaster” a seven and-a-half foot long 92 pound Albino American Alligator swims in his tank at the Blackwater Swamp Exhibit in the South Carolina Aquarium.

Did you know that alligators are a native predator species in the South Carolina Lowcountry? And that you can adopt Alabaster the Albino American Alligator?

A few more Fun Facts:  There are only two species of alligator in the world – the American alligator and the Chinese alligator American alligators have a lifespan of 35-50 years, and have been known to live up to 80 years in captivity Alligators can stay underwater for 45-60 minutes Alligators will go dormant (not a true hibernation) when the weather gets cold 80 – 100 teeth may be in the mouth of the alligator.  When teeth wear down, new teeth grow in.  An alligator may go through 2,000 – 3,000 teeth in a lifetime

South Carolina Aquarium’s River Otters

 (Kathryn Wagner)

A North American River Otter swims through the sunlight in the Mountain Forest exhibit at the South Carolina Aquarium in Charleston, South Carolina.

Fun Facts About the North American River OtterThey can swim up to 12 mph and can run 18 mph. Otters swimming beneath ice for long periods of time are known to use trapped air bubbles to continue to get oxygen. River otters close their nostrils and ears while underwater, and can hold their breath for about 4 minutes. The maximum known time for an otter to hold its breath is 8 minutes. Otters view their environment with a variety of senses, but their whiskers are very sensitive to physical sensations, and are important in hunting.

Interested in supporting the South Carolina Aquarium? Become a volunteer or “adopt” an otter today.